Cataract Surgery Specialist

Egan Eye Associates

Katherine Egan, OD

Therapeutic Optometrist and Optometric Glaucoma Specialist located in Frisco, TX

Cataracts are a common cause of vision problems among older men and women, and though they aren’t preventable, they’re highly treatable. At Egan Eye Associates in Frisco, Texas, therapeutic optometrist Katherine Egan, OD, screens for cataracts and provides co-management for cataract surgery. Don’t ignore blurry or cloudy vision. Schedule an appointment over the phone.

Cataract Surgery Q & A

How do cataracts affect your vision?

Cataracts cause blurry, foggy, and cloudy vision. They affect the lenses of your eyes, which work like the lens of a camera, focusing light so you can see things both close and from afar. When you have a cataract, it’s as if these lenses are “out of focus.”

When you have a cataract that’s large enough to affect your vision, you encounter difficulties with everyday, routine tasks, and activities. Cataracts make it difficult to read and watch television, and you may find it hard to make out people’s facial expressions. In general, the world may look less bright, vivid, and colorful.

Other signs of a cataract include:

  • “Halos” around lights, including oncoming headlights when driving
  • Difficulty seeing at night
  • Needing more light to see
  • Sensitivity to light or glare
  • Frequent changes to your eyeglass prescription

If you’ve noticed any concerning changes to your vision, schedule an appointment with Dr. Egan right away.

What causes cataracts to form?

Cataracts form when the proteins in the lenses of your eyes break down and clump together. These proteins block light from reaching your retinas, causing blurry vision and making your eyes appear cloudy. 

In fact, when you have cloudy vision from a cataract, it’s because you’re looking directly at the cataract.

Cataracts develop slowly and usually affect both eyes, but not at the same rate. In their early stages, they only cover a tiny part of your eye, so you can usually adjust and simply look away from the cataract. Cataracts require attention when they grow large enough that you can no longer ignore them.

Cataracts are usually age-related and affect people age 60 and older. Younger people can sometimes develop cataracts if they’ve sustained eye injuries or are born with certain genetic conditions.

How are cataracts treated?

The only way to permanently resolve a cataract is surgery to remove it. You may not need surgery right away. If you have an early cataract, your optometrist may recommend nonsurgical methods to adapt, including special lenses to reduce glare and improving the lighting in your home.

Dr. Egan monitors your cataracts. If your cataract is too large for you to adapt to it, she provides a referral to a trusted local ophthalmologist for surgery and co-manages your treatment.

Cataract surgery is a quick, safe, and effective outpatient procedure. Your ophthalmologist removes the cloudy lens and replaces it with a clear artificial lens.

Dr. Egan helps you with post-operative care, which includes adapting to the new artificial lens and managing any discomfort you may have while recovering. She’s experienced in managing complications of cataract surgery like increased eye pressure and dryness. 

You can expect to return to everyday activities and see a dramatic improvement to your vision within a few days, but the surgery takes up to a month to fully heal.

To get a diagnosis for blurry and cloudy vision or learn more about cataract surgery, schedule an appointment with Dr. Egan online or over the phone.